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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
.i. joe," the lakers and the celtics in the championship. apple wuss big, then it -- was big, then it went away for a while, then it was back again. so it should be obvious that the 1980s is back, and for various reasons i argue in the book, it is back. and i don't think it's just because of the nostalgia factor although that's certainly a factor. also there's some coincidences. i had mentioned on my radio show a couple days ago that the weird coincidence, although you may see it not just as a coincidence, that 25 years ago almost to the exact week and, certainly, to the exact month the united states military was bombing libya, and the world was wrapped with the detention about a nuclear meltdown at chernobyl. those two things happened almost exactly 25 years ago to the month. so as much of this is pop culture, some of it is very, very real. and what i argue in the book is that the popular culture of the 1980s, the iconography of the 1980s in many ways has inspired the way we hook at real world -- look at real world events and how real world, i guess you would call them actors, behave toda
in 1949, there was a big movement towards creating a bigger bomb called the thermonuclear bomb which is how the bugs got sioux high up. the father of the atomic bomb at the time opposed that on moral grounds and said it was not a good idea to create a weapon that's larger than its target. in other words, the thermonuclear bomb is so big that it would not wipe out a military installation, but wipe out a whole city. the thermonuclear bomb that sent bugs aloft that ken coal lips flew through was a thermonuclear bomb that was 10 megatons and that bomb is big enough if it's dropped on manhattan, it would wipe out all five burroughs and kill 75% of the population down to washington dc over time so that's a bomb that's bigger than its target, and in my book, i think, one of the more interesting animal -- animal ash analysis i came across was how to prevent war. on the other side of the fence over at the atomic test site, the department of defense were practicing how to have a nuclear war. this spy plane that ken collins was flying was called the a-12 oxcart and it was just declassified by t
make work in a really big way with the kind of focus, a more expensive list cannot. >> cary goldstein is publisher and editor-in-chief of 12books.com is a website. >> senator mike lee is reading it is dangerous to the right when the government is wrong by judge andrew napolitano. >> visit booktv.org to see this and other summer reading lists. >> next on booktv republican congressman james rogan 3 counts his role in the impeachment trial of president bill clinton and the affect the verdict had on the executive branch. the author contends by not executing impeachment proceedings against the president a precedent would have been set allowing future presidents to remain above the law. this is about 50 minutes. >> you admire james rogan. you have to read the book rough edges which many of you probably have. we premiered it here when it first came out. it is about his life from welfare to washington. it is fascinating because he has in toward -- in toward a tough life which all of a sudden said this isn't for me and picked himself up and dusted himself off and went on to be very successful
are no longer serious about solving big problems. and that was sort of the subject of my first book in 2007 looking ahead to the 2008 presidential race. and the big issues in education, and health care, and energy, the environment and jobs, and so on, and i think that you can really see that playing out in washington right now as we have this debate about the budget. and that this budget debate in some ways has become about paul ryan and his plan and his thinking of the budget. but that the idea that we as a nation can all agree that there is one guy in washington talking seriously about the budget is an indictment of everyone else in congress who is not, that we're sort of at this point where you want to talk about the budget? there's one guy is taking this really seriously. he's the one who's thinking about how to solve the budget problem. these are huge issues. generational issues that are going to have to be solved one way or another. and the fact that there's not a larger debate that involves more people on both sides of the aisle i think is a stunning indictment of where we are in a p
is not the first place that would come to mind to have a big ice skating right. among other reasons, because it nothing ever freezes there. but this is what we did last year, and we made it into the guinness book of world records. so you ask yourself, ask this question a couple of years ago, why in the world do we do this? and he came up with a sort of intelligent answer. because this is the kind of competition we like. we are the only ones competing. [laughter] you can't lose if you're in the competition for the world's biggest because nobody else is doing it. nobody else is crazy enough to do this stuff, just in time or money on a. not going to happen. and so, we love that kind of competition. the problem of course is that that version to competition extends antitrust policy, what extent of the type of monopolies we have, would've extended the type of concentration of power we have. then it gets complicated. then things don't work anymore. and so i going to the same story about slim which i think is most respectful but also somewhat critical, not of his personality or persona, but the situ
the 1970's in which his shadow was cast with the book common ground and labor history in which his but big trouble also casts a big set up was particularly daunting. but extraordinarily rewarding. there are certain voices that one hears when one writes. anthony lukas was one. i'm very humbled to receive this award. thank you. [applause] [applause] >> next finalist his paul greenberg. the future of the last while food. ♪ has written everything but the ticket from the outer banks to japan to norway in pursuit of the good fish, self sustaining, plentiful, tasty comanche. taught was such a fish and to commercial fishing lives like a contender for a while. tuna, the fourth fish will never be any of those things except for tasty. the number one example of what not seek. his case for environmental response will fishing industry and 39 for all is both highly readable and very important. come on up. [applause] [applause] >> i'll say a word to. i am really glad to see fish recognized in the general scheme of things. often their under water, and is really no coincidence that there are not recognize
city is not the first place that would come to mind to have a big as giving rank. among other reasons because nothing ever freezes there. but, this is what we did last year, and we made it to the guinness book of records. so you ask yourself, and mexican sociologists ask this question a couple of years ago. why in the world that we do this? came up with a very intelligent answer. this is the kind of competition we like. we are the only ones competing. [laughter] you can't lose if you're in the competition for the world's biggest because nobody else is doing it. nobody else is crazy enough to do this and spend time or money on it. it's not going to happen. so we love that kind of competition. the problem, of course, is that aversion to competition when it extends into antitrust policy it gets complicated. i go into the same stories. carlos. but respectful but also somewhat critical, not of his personality or persona, but of his situation which also has to do with another trait that i described, individualism. this is not often been said that not only does slim concentrate and net worth
history in which his struggle also cast a big shadow was particularly daunting. but extraordinarily rewarding. and there are certain voices that one hears when one right and anthony lukas is one of those and i'm very humbled to receive this award. thank you. [applause] >> next finalists is paul greenberg for four fish: the future of the last love to. the outer banks from japan to norway and the pursuit of the good fish. self-sustaining, plentiful, tasty and cheap. cod was such a fish until commercial fishing decimated day. it was a contender for a while. the fourth fish except for tasty in its number one example gutenberg's case for an environmentally responsible fishing industry and food enough for all is both highly readable and very important. [applause] >> i'll say a word or two. i'm really glad to see fish recognized in the general scheme of things. often they are underwater and it's really no coincidence that they are not recognized under water. there are many, many fish in the sea. can't talk about all of them, they just want to leave you with one thing, which is this year i
aliens across the gulfstream from cuba into key west also a big part of the scene then and then cuba itself was locked in revolution. there was a right wing military dictator in power and there was a growing revolt and a lot of revolutionary activity and gun running. really an exciting time to be here in key west. he loved the fishing. he loved hispanic culture. he loved the real people here and the kind of hard-boiled life that they led dealing with these two cultures. in a transitional periods. >> each one of these programs was focusing on a particular work of this writer and we're dealing with the sun also rises in the modern library list of books at the end of the 20th. this was number 45 of the most influential novels of the century. for him which book was it? >> for hemingway it was his first novel. his very first book was a collection of short stories called in our time, which absolutely a groundbreaking book. one of the things we need to remember in hemingway, in a sense he really created literary modernism and brought it into the mainstream and clear prose that completely ov
the same standard. you can talk about president obama that he is a big boy, even talk about michele but leave the daughters out of it. they are little girls. come on. we don't do the work we could do to stand up and put a line in the sand for our people. can we put a line in the sand for our people? that is all i am asking for. you know and i know when we make the phone calls we do the work. one phone call people think of as 1,000 people but who calls? you say that was just messed up. i was so mad that was messed up. don't be mad. get even. danny glover had a verizon commercial. they got mad at his politics and he lost it. why has rush limbaugh and never lost anything. i am exposing myself. have my back, please. come on. they talk about us as though we are in human. no one stands up for us. what is wrong with us? that is a story of surviving and thriving. we only win the game when we play the game. we have got to play the game. >> i have a moment of shock when the girls went to africa with their mother. it was the first time i realized there are black girl living in the white house.
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)